Author Archives: allenmickle

Eusebeia – Issue 9 Available Soon!

The Spring (yes I know it is Summer already!) issue of Eusebeia: The Bulletin of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies is almost finished being edited and will be available soon. The following is the list of articles in the upcoming journal. All but two articles were presented at last years Annual Conference.

“A GREAT THIRST FOR READING”: ANDREW FULLER THE THEOLOGICAL READER by MICHAEL A.G. HAYKIN

ANDREW FULLER: HEIR OF THE REFORMATION by JEFFREY K. JUE

JOHN OWEN AND ANDREW FULLER by CARL R. TRUEMAN

ANDREW FULLER’S READING OF JOHN GILL by BARRY HOWSON

THE INFLUENCE OF JONATHAN EDWARDS ON ANDREW FULLER by THOMAS J. NETTLES

SENSE OF THE HEART: JONATHAN EDWARDS’ LEGACY IN THE WRITING OF ANDREW FULLER by CHRIS CHUN

CHRIST’S ABSOLUTE DETERMINATION TO SAVE: ANDREW FULLER AND PARTICULAR REDEMPTION by JEREMY PITTSLEY

ANDREW FULLER’S ORDINATION SERMONS by NIGEL WHEELER

THE LETTERS OF JOHN ERSKINE TO THE RYLANDS by JONATHAN YEAGER

For more information about receiving this issue, subscribing to Eusebeia, or attending this year’s conference (August 25-26, 2008 at SBTS) then contact Steve Weaver at andrewfullercenter@sbts.edu.

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Missiological Implications of the Optimism in Jonathan Edwards’s Humble Attempt

It is well known that Humble Attempt helped spark the missionary movement when John Ryland Jr. received a parcel of books from John Erskine in 1784. Ryland, fully aware of the esteem in which Fuller and Sutcliff held Edwards, swiftly send them the books and thereby changed missions history. The secondary literatures have recognized the influence of Humble Attempt on the Prayer Call of 1784, but few have seen the role that Edwards’s eschatological optimism played in driving the British missionary enterprise. Edwards’s thinking about the end of the world depended on his interpretation of the slaying of the witnesses in Revelation 11. Some thought this implied a coming catastrophe for the church, but Edwards argued for the exact opposite in order to promote the Concert of Prayer. Edwards feared that if the slaying of the witnesses were a future event yet to be fulfilled, it would be a great “hindrance” for the Concert. Instead Edwards argued for an unprecedented outpouring of the Spirit of God, and a time when the whole world would embrace the light of the gospel, with Christ’s kingdom victorious against the dark world. Fuller also saw the ransacked days of the church as a thing of the past, for he interpreted the French Revolution as a crucial sign that that shook the “papal world to its centre.” The fact that Humble Attempt was reprinted in 1789, when the Revolution began, seemed to confirm the optimistic Edwardsean eschatology which Fuller adopted. Although Fuller did not stress immediacy in the way Edwards did, both believed the latter days would be publicly discernible, and that the current ascendancy of Protestantism, coupled with diminishing papal authority in Europe and America, were evidence of fulfillment of apocalyptic forecasts in the Book of Revelation. This optimistic eschatological outlook encouraged Fuller and motivated those in Northamptonshire to pray more fervently. It became the groundwork for courage to engage in rigorous foreign missions. In describing the 1789 edition of the Humble Attempt, Fuller speaks about “how much this publication contributed to that tone of feeling” and gave the confidence to “venture,” and face their “fear” in taking on a missionary task of “such magnitude.” He adds, “I cannot say; but it doubtless had a very considerable influence on [BMS].” In such a setting, it is not surprising that William Carey was able to find confident expectation in propagating the success of the Great Commissions to the church, and thus coined his famous phrase, “Attempt great things for God; Expect great things from God.” It could therefore be reckoned that while Edwards and Fuller may have been mistaken about their interpretations of the apocalyptic particulars in the history of the world, but there is no doubt behind the formation of BMS in general, and Fuller’s view in particular that this was the worldview that fuelled the global missions. For good or ill, it is in this eschatological climate, that BMS and the Modern Missionary Movement was born. 

 

– Chris Chun –

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Announcement from an Elephant of Kettering Member

I received the following news from Chris Chun, member of The Elephant of Kettering blog:

He has finally submitted his PhD dissertation (260 pages). The thesis is entitled: “The Greatest Instruction Received from Human Writings: The Legacy of Jonathan Edwards in the Theology of Andrew Fuller.” The only thing left is the oral defense (viva) of his thesis, which is scheduled in June of 2008. To add to this great news, he has been appointed professor of Church History at Golden Gate Theological Seminary in San Francisco, CA.

Many congratulations to this excellent up and coming Church historian and Fuller lover!

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Liam Goligher Lectures Available Online

The Liam Goligher Lectures are available online now from the annual Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies conferece held in Cambridge, ON on Saturday.

The Emergent Church: Reinventing Liberalism

Preaching the Cross Today

See blog reviews by Michael Haykin and Kirk Wellum.

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Annual Canadian Lectures – Dr. Liam Goligher

Announcing the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies Annual Canadian conference being held in Cambridge, ON on April 5, 2008.

Dr. Liam Goligher will be speaking twice that day on two very important topics in theology today:

Emergent: Reinventing Liberalism?

Pierced for our Transgressions: Preaching the Cross Today

The lectures will begin at 9:30 AM and will conclude by 12:15 PM. They are being held at Grace Bible Church.  There is no cost for the lectures but we will be taking a love offering to help cover the costs of the lectures. Sola Scriptura Ministries International will be having a book table there selling affordable Reformed literature. If you have any questions do not hesitate to contact me at allen.mickle.jr [at] gmail.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE SEE THE LECTURE FLYER AVAILABLE HERE.

Liam Goligher is Senior Minister of Duke Street Church, Richmond, London. He studied at Irish Baptist College, Belfast; University of Waterloo, Ontario; and Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi and has pastored churches in Ireland, Canada, Scotland, and London. A regular at the UK’s Keswick Convention and at similar conventions throughout the world, Dr. Goligher has led University missions in the UK and Europe and his Sunday sermons can be heard throughout the UK on Premier Radio.

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Andrew Fuller News!

Greetings friends of Fuller!

I wanted to keep you abreast of some Fuller news…

First, with some slight changes, this next issue of Eusebeia: The Bulletin of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies will be dedicated to Andrew Fuller. Instead of the issue on the Puritans (which has been moved to the Fall 2008 issue) this coming issue (Spring 2008) will have many of the papers that were presented at last years Fuller conference that was held at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary as well as a few others that were not. So, if you are a fan of Fuller, look forward to this coming issue with articles by Tom Nettles, Barry Howson, Jeff Jue, Carl Trueman, and Russ Moore amongst others!

Second, if you are anywhere near the Chicago area on March 28-29 be sure to visit the Midwest Regional Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society being held at the Moody Bible Institute. On Friday at 11:00 AM, yours truly, will be presenting a paper titled, “‘To Declare the Whole Counsel of God’: Andrew Fuller (1754-1815) on Preaching.” I do hope at least a handful of people will attend! If you are unable to attend the conference presentation, I will be planning on seeking publication for the article in the near future and will keep you all informed.

Blessings to you all!

Allen Mickle

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Happy Birthday!

 

Friends of Fuller rejoice! It was just our good friend, Andrew Fuller’s, 254 birthday yesterday. Fuller was born on February 5, 1754. Let us continue to celebrate and remember the influence that this man of God had in his own time and that he continues to have today! Happy Birthday Andrew Fuller!

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Upcoming Issues of Eusebeia

Greetings friends of The Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies. I wanted to whet your appetite and let you know of what the next few issues of Eusebeia will be devoted.

Spring 2008 – The Puritans

Fall 2008 – 17th Century English Baptists

Spring 2009 – T. T. Shields and Fundamentalism

Stay on the lookout for these upcoming issues of the journal. If you are interested in subscribing ($20 USD in North America, $30 USD outside North America) contact Allen Mickle, Managing Editor (allen.mickle.jr@gmail.com).

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Building Bridges? Try Andrew Fuller

As most readers of this blog are likely aware, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and Founders Ministry recently teamed up to cosponsor a major conference on the role of Calvinism in SBC life. The persons behind the conference recognize that there has been a resurgence of Calvinism in the SBC in recent years, and that there is evidence this is having a polarizing effect within the convention. They were able to gather over 550 SBC pastors, laymen, and educators in an effort to build bridges between those who hold differing opinions on the value of the Calvinistic resurgence.

One of the many highlights of the Building Bridges Conference was Dr. Daniel Akin’s closing address, “Answering the Call to a Great Commission Resurgence.” Dr. Akin’s final words did a masterful job of summing up the themes which had already been discussed throughout the conference. He let it be known that the Calvinism that was in vogue in Baptist circles when the SBC was formed was an evangelical, missions-minded Calvinism. Far from being a threat to evangelism and missions, it actually acted as an impetus to these important emphases. Dr. Akin reminded his hearers:

“The modern missionary movement was launched by a Baptist. It was also launched by a Calvinist. His name was William Carey. He represents the best and healthiest stream of the Calvinist tradition and one I can enthusiastically embrace. Carey did not receive universal support in his desire to get the gospel to the “heathen” as they were called in his day. There was another tributary of Calvinism that was resolute in its opposition to the aspirations of young William. This type of Calvinism was of no value in Carey’s day. It is of no value in our day. I believe significant headway can be made as we depart from this conference if, in heart and confession, it can be said, I am a “Carey Calvinist.” I am a “Judson Calvinist.” I am a “Spurgeon Calvinist.” I am a Calvinist who embraces with my whole being our Lord’s command to take the gospel across the street and around the world.”

As students of Fuller will recognize, he could also have said, a “Fuller Calvinist.” Each of the men he mentioned would have recognized Fuller’s theology as that which informed their minds, warmed their hearts, and moved them to heroic exertions on behalf of the lost. In fact, Fuller’s name came up quite often in the papers presented at the conference. May God grant that the new-found appreciation for Fuller and his theology sparks a renewal in Southern Baptist life as powerful as that which ensued when he lived and worked among British Particular Baptists.

Paul Brewster

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Does your Library Subscribe to Eusebeia?

Does your library subscribe to Eusebeia? If not, they should! We are sending a complimentary copy of Issue 8 of the journal to a number of libraries with the hope of their subscription. If your library does not subscribe, please encourage them to do so! $20 USD in North America and $30 USD outside North America. They can subscribe through EBSCO or directly through the journal. Subscriptions can be sent directly to:

The Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies
C/O The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
2825 Lexington Road
Louisville, KY 40280

Help promote Eusebeia in any way you can! Look forward to Issue 9 which should be dedicated to the Puritans and Issue 10 to 17th Century English Baptists.

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